3D animation Tag

Morehshin Allahyari - Bitrates

بیت بر ثانیه – Bitrates (2014)

Bitrates is the first New Media Art exhibition in the city of Shiraz in Iran, curated and organized by artists Morehshin Allahyari and Mani Nilchiani, hosted by Dar-ol-Hokoomeh Project at Shiraz Artist House. With a vision to create a space dedicated to emerging artistic practices, workshops, talks, presentations and exhibitions, Dar-ol-Hokoomeh Project (co-founded by Mohsen Hazrati and Milad Forouzandeh) seeks to expose the creative community and general public to the potentials of new technologies and New Media theory and practice.

In their curation process, Morehshin and Mani have selected artists that each use variety of digital tools, material, and software in their works to present a specific category and technological aesthetics of new media art; from artgame, creative coding, experimental 3D animation to glitch art and animated GIF. The significance of the term “Bit Rate” is two fold: On the one hand, every digital art work at one point or the other needs to navigate the bottleneck of “bits”. Ideas turn into bits, bits are streamed over a network, to a screen, or to a tangible output such as a 3D printer to form an experience. While simultaneously, as a generation who sought their exposure to the world outside through slow, clunky dial-up modems, our interaction with the world at large was at the mercy of “bit rate”. بیت بر ثانیه (Bitrates) draws attention to these ideas through the presentation of the work that engages and explores technology and internet as a medium.

Featuring: Morehshin Allahyari, Benjamin Bacon, Andrew Blanton, Alex Myers, Brenna Murphy, Ramsey Nasser, Mani Nilchiani, Daniel Rourke, Alfredo Salzar-Caro, Angela Washko.

A lecture and a Q & A session will be held with Morehshin Allahyari and Mani Nilchiani at Daralhokoomeh on Sunday May 25th, 6:30 PM.

Website: http://daralhokoomeh.com

***GIFbites is one of the projects of Bitrates exhibition (curated by Daniel Rourke). For the opening of Bitrates, a selected version of this project was displayed in the gallery, followed by a complete showcase of all the GIFs for the GIFbites exhibition, May 30th-June 6.

The Romantic Self-Exiles II (2012)

<I ask you to show me the view of Tehran from your Balcony. You look back into the monitor: “ But remember? It’s hard to breath here. Darkness hides it all.” You still showed me the lights, the beautiful lights of Tehran which I only started to dream of after I left>.

The Romantic Self Exiles II is a physical extension of The Romantic Self Exiles I (3D animation), and a representation of imagined, dreamed, romanticized, beautiful Tehran. It iterates the city through the experience of my embodied self and peers, and it attests to our mobility within the city along with our inability to return after having left.

The Romantic Self Exiles at Chicago Cultural Center

The Romantic Self-Exiles I (2012)

To build a land; an imaginary home. To push the limits of real and unreal, memory and imagination, locality and universality, self censorship and self- exile, time and space.To put together my most vivid memories on flat planes or 3D cubes. Inside and outside the empty rooms, rooms without bodies, rooms left behind. To construct the remembered, missed, identical objects. Things I care for,love the most, miss the most… To put together every five sense of my body into one (“sight”) through text and animation. A reflection and presentation of emotional attachments. Collective and personal.

Over There Is Over Here (2011)

Over There Is Over Here explores the dialectics of time, space, real and unreal to define and explore the position of those who have left Iran versus the political prisoners.

The project uses 3D animation and data glitch as a way to illustrate presence-less presence and to show the passage and collapse of the time. In my recent trip to Iran, I found a picture of political prisoners, which is at least 100years old. Looking at the prisoners chained to each other, I saw a tragic relationship between the past and the present of Iran; a shared pain from the same soul, generation after generation. In my animation, the concept of time is used as a non-linear and collapsed concept in which the past and present have come together in order to create an “unreal” reality. Through a self-reflexive narrator, Over There Is Over Here alternates between the literary definition of a third person narrator to my actual, physical “third person” role outside Iran as narrator of the story. The narrator explores my relationship with imprisoned friends and classmates. In this relationship, I am the outsider who will always fail to understand the reality of a prisoner’s life. The more I live outside Iran, the more I will forget details of the “reality” of life inside Iran. For these reasons, the animation is a deliberate mix of real and unreal, fake and genuine.